How CIOs Can Fund Telehealth

August 18, 2015 by By InTouch Health

Several recent CIO surveys indicate that many of them would like to move more boldly into telehealth, but they’re facing a host of challenges, including:

  • Numerous “must-have” implementations like ICD-10 and data security updates – CIOs can’t ignore the Oct. 1 deadline for ICD-10 – and they’re scared that their facilities will experience costly data breaches like the ones that have hit healthcare giants like Community Health Systems.
  • A huge amount of “technical debt” – Most health systems have made major investments in EHRs and revenue cycle systems, not to mention all the servers and network hardware to support them. The ongoing optimization of these systems can be staggeringly expensive.

Some CIOs are dealing with these challenges by implementing “lean” initiatives and arranging innovative financing (like obtaining telehealth software and hardware on a subscription or rental basis).

When CIOs try to fund telehealth programs in cash-strapped organizations, two strategies are the most promising:

Demonstrating how telehealth directly impacts the quality of care – While it’s hard to make the case that a new HR or billing system improves patient care, every dollar spent on telehealth boosts care quality: greater access, less wait time, fewer hospital readmissions, and much more.

Getting clinician buy-in – Many physicians aren’t sold on EHRs because they seem like a more cumbersome way to document what they’ve always done. But telehealth technology clearly makes clinicians’ jobs easier (e.g., the ability to do telerounds without ever leaving home). Once clinicians get past their initial reservations about telehealth, they really love what the technology can accomplish.

It’s true that IT budgets are tight, but CIOs can find the telehealth funding they need by documenting its impact on patient outcomes and long-term financial performance. Telehealth is something that clinicians can get excited about…which isn’t the case with back-office applications like purchasing and timekeeping systems.  And when clinicians clamor for something, they usually get it.